Climate

Tufa Dinku, a researcher at Columbia University's International Research Institute for Climate and Society, is working to fill Africa's climate-data gaps by combining satellite measurements with sparse on-the-ground weather-station data. Improved weather and climate forecasts can help farmers and epidemiologists increase crop yields and limit the spread of malaria and other infectious diseases.
Kate Marvel on the steps of Low Library with Alma Mater behind her.

Photo by John Pinderhughes

Kate Marvel is an associate research scientist at both the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. She has been focusing on earth's rising temperature and the role clouds play in climate change.

The Columbia community is thinking of those who are contending with flooding and related emergencies. In addition to individual school deans of students, there are immediate resources available:

Columbia Counseling and Psychological Services:

Amelia Wolf walking through a field of flowers and a mountain scenery behind her.

Amelia Wolf in the California field she used to study what effect diversity loss would have on the remaining plants.

Gardeners and nature lovers have noticed that plants are flowering earlier every year—a phenomenon generally attributed to climate change.

morningside campus aerial

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Columbia University has pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 35 percent in the next three years through a mix of energy conservation and efficiency measures under its first campus sustainability plan.

Building on Columbia’s longstanding commitment to addressing climate change, the University’s Trustees have voted to support a recommendation from the Advisory Committee on Socially Responsible Investing (ACSRI) to divest from companies deriving more than 35% of their revenue from thermal

Oyster ecosystem

Associate Professor Kate Orff’s Oyster-tecture is a plan to bring oysters, which filter water and form reefs that can buffer against storm surges, back to New York Harbor. The project, expected to be completed by 2019, will create bays to host finfish, shellfish and lobsters while reducing erosion. It will also serve as an environmental education site. Courtesy of Kate Orff

As cities worldwide attempt to redefine the relationship between urban ecology and design in response to a changing climate, landscape architect Kate Orff is approaching her work as a synthesis of art, science, nature, climate and community.
Chile President Michelle Bachelet on Columbia University's Research Boat

President of Chile Michelle Bachelet, at podium, visits Columbia University's research vessel the Langseth with Karen Poniachik (left), Director of the Santiago Global Center. Photo by Carlos Díaz / Columbia Global Center Santiago

Chilean president Michelle Bachelet visited the R/V Marcus G. Langseth on Jan. 9 when it docked at the port city of Valparaiso, touring the ship—which is operated by Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory--on its months-long voyage to map the occurrences of earthquakes and tsunamis in the region.
Geoffrey Heal

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Geoffrey Heal studied physics and economics as an undergraduate, but has always cared deeply about the environment. “I’ve been interested in nature all my life,” he says.

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