Columbia Engineering

EEG experiment led by Andrew Goldman

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, says a new study led by Andrew Goldman, a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University (pictured). 

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, a new study by Columbia researchers finds. The results suggest that musical improvisation, like so many other skills, improves with practice as the brain learns to categorize musical structures in a new way.
Instagram selfie of study coauthor Ana-Andreea Stoica

A network effect known as homophily may reduce women’s visibility on social media when recommendation algorithms are added, says a new study. Above, a selfie from study coauthor Ana-Andreea Stoica's Instagram account. (Courtesy of Stoica)

When recommendation algorithms are turned loose on a social network with homophily, women become less visible, says a new study by Columbia researchers.

00:00 - What made him want to become an astronaut
01:06 - Seeing "The Right Stuff", affirming his astronaut ambition