Data Science Institute

EEG experiment led by Andrew Goldman

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, says a new study led by Andrew Goldman, a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University (pictured). 

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, a new study by Columbia researchers finds. The results suggest that musical improvisation, like so many other skills, improves with practice as the brain learns to categorize musical structures in a new way.

Researchers set out four microphones like this one in the foothills of Alaska's Brooks Range to record songbird calls over five breeding seasons. In a new study, they describe an automated tool for sifting through thousands of hours of recordings to estimate when migratory birds arrive en masse in the Arctic. (Photo credit: Heather Greaves)

In a new study, scientists describe a way to quickly sift through thousands of hours of field recordings to estimate when songbirds arrive at their Arctic breeding grounds. Their research could be applied to any dataset of animal vocalizations to understand how migratory animals are responding to climate change.
Instagram selfie of study coauthor Ana-Andreea Stoica

A network effect known as homophily may reduce women’s visibility on social media when recommendation algorithms are added, says a new study. Above, a selfie from study coauthor Ana-Andreea Stoica's Instagram account. (Courtesy of Stoica)

When recommendation algorithms are turned loose on a social network with homophily, women become less visible, says a new study by Columbia researchers.