On Exhibit

On the south side of West 125th Street stands a four-story, century-old building whose façade is sheathed in milky white terracotta. When it was built in 1909, at the same time that the Morningside Heights campus, it was a state-of-the-art bottling plant for Sheffield Farms.
Works by some of the major artists of the past 50 years are on view in the exhibition Open This End: Contemporary Art from the Collection of Blake Byrne at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery.
NYC's Main Post Office 1901-1939

New York City’s main post office, completed in 1901, was torn down in 1939 to make way for an extension of City Hall.

When Andrew Dolkart was a student at Colgate University in the early 1970s, he was an avid reader of Ada Louise Huxtable’s architecture columns in The New York Times.

Thomas Merton manuscript in the outline of an angel

Thomas Merton's papers are now on display at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.  

Thomas Merton (CC’38, MA’39) was a monk, mystic, best-selling author, poet, civil rights activist and photographer. These facets of his life and more are on display at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library in a show that celebrates the centennial of his birth and showcases Columbia’s collection of his papers and photographs.

The list of the rich and famous who are buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx reads like a veritable Who’s Who of late 19th and early 20th century New York high society: Alva Belmont, formerly Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, F.W.

In the midst of Word War I, Dutch businessman and historical memorabilia collector Maurice Frankenhuis (1893-1969) began to acquire a collection of posters, coins and medals that he then started to sell to support his family while hiding from the Nazis during World War II.

“Tofakhon in Bukhara” by Joan Roth.

Beginning in the 1920s, Jewish men and women, as members of the Soviet avant-garde of state photographers and photojournalists, transformed how people in the Soviet Union visualized, conceptualized and thought about their country, the war and the world around them, according to Professor R

Arts at Columbia

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University presents "HYPER-RESEMBLANCES," curated by Alison Coplan, Heidi Hirschl and Kathleen Langjahr.

Look up! As you walk through some of New York’s best-loved public spaces, you’ll see the magnificent work of Spanish immigrant Rafael Guastavino, who, with his son Rafael Jr., figured out how to decorate the grand domes and arches of America’s leading Beaux-Arts architects.

A century ago, Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) was among the city’s most prominent sculptors, known for her naturalistic animal sculptures and heroic figures.

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