Film

Black and white photo of Frankenstein

Boris Karloff as Frankenstein's monster in the 1931 film Frankenstein.

“If the last 200 years have taught us anything, it’s that Frankenstein is an immortal book.”
Add these Columbia faculty books to the end of your summer.
Ramin Bahrani, Michael B. Jordan, Michael Shannon

Director Ramin Bahrani (left) stands with the lead actors in a film adaptation of 'Fahrenheit 451,' Michael B. Jordan and Michael Shannon. Photo by Michael Gibson/HBO

Ramin Bahrani's film, a modern retelling of Ray Bradbury’s dystopian classic was produced for HBO and will also screen at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg in a red blouse in front of a blue Columbia Law School poster

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (LAW’59) turns 85 in March but has the energy of someone half her age.

Annette Insdorf

Photo Courtesy of Columbia University School of the Arts

Annette Insdorf has been a professor in the film program at the School of the Arts for 30 years, teaching Cinema History to undergraduates in the fall and Analysis of F

A scene from the movie The Wizard of Oz

Image Courtesy of Metro Goldwyn Mayer

The song "Over the Rainbow" almost didn't make into the final movie version of 'The Wizard of Oz.' Walter Frisch, a professor of music, traces the history of the classic song in his latest book "Arlen and Harburg’s Over the Rainbow."
Noam Elcott Columbia University Film Professor
Most people walk into a darkened theater and think nothing of it. Not Noam Elcott, an associate professor of art history.
Katherine Dieckmann, Columbia University

Katherine Dieckmann leading a Cafe Columbia talk on the process of screenwriting and making movies.

Associate Professor Katherine Dieckmann is a film director and screenwriter known for her lyrical, character-driven work.

In the movie Still Alice, Julianne Moore plays a Columbia linguistics professor who is diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s, an extremely rare version of the disease.

Photo from Wikimedia commons
How did Columbia wrestler Nat Pendleton (CC’1916) score parts in both the 1920 Olympics and the Marx Brothers movie Horse Feathers?

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