History

Mae Ngai

Mae Ngai’s interest in the history of immigration and labor began when she was a high school student in the 1960s.

This spring, Godzilla has been wreaking havoc worldwide as the latest incarnation of the skyscraper-sized lizard stomps its way back onto the silver screen. The 2014 reboot of the iconic film franchise also highlights an enduring research interest of Gregory M.

Columbia University Archival History Slavery

King's College on Park Place, circa 1776

America’s earliest academies, like the nation itself, have a legacy of slavery woven into their very fabric. In his latest work MIT historian Craig Steven Wilder (GSAS’89,’93,’94) examines the tarnished relationship between the Atlantic slave trade and the rise of the American college.

After a distinguished career that has spawned numerous books and television series on everything from the French Revolution to the slave trade, Columbia Professor of Art History and History Simon Schama is now unveiling his most personal project yet: "The Story of the Jews," a mu

Eight hundred years ago, relatively small armies of mounted warriors suddenly exploded outward from the cold, arid high-elevation grasslands of Mongolia, and conquered the largest contiguous empire in history.

Columbia University announced today that two acclaimed works will be awarded the 2014 Bancroft Prize:

Columbia campus

Columbia University and Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith are pleased to announce that Dominique Morisseau’s "Detroit ‘67" is the 2014 winner of the Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History.

Pamela Smith speaks at the University Lecture. Photo by Eileen Barroso

History professor Pamela Smith started college thinking she would be a chemist.

Image: John Sloan's Sunday, Women Drying Their Hair

Over 27 days in 1913, 87,000 New Yorkers visited the 69th Regiment Armory at Lexington Avenue and 25th Street and came face-to-face with modern art for the first time. “Everybody went and everybody talked about it,” wrote photographer and author Carl Van Vechten.

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, 1918 – 2013

"As a university long dedicated to human rights around the globe and civil rights here at home, we in the Columbia community feel acutely the loss of a true world leader like Nelson Mandela," said Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger.

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