Public Health

Inactivation of Foxo1, a gene important for metabolism generated insulin producing cells in small intestines of newborn mice, as detected by immunofluorescence in red.Drs. Talchai and Accili found that when they turned off a gene known to play a role in cell fate decisions—Foxo1—the progenitor cells also generated insulin-producing cells. More cells were generated when Foxo1 was turned off early in development, but insulin-producing cells were also generated when the gene was turned off after the mice had reached adulthood.

A study by Columbia researchers suggests that cells in the patient’s intestine could be coaxed into making insulin, circumventing the need for a stem cell transplant.

As the world remembers the horrors of the disaster on its one-year anniversary, experts at the Mailman School take stock of disaster response, nuclear fears and lessons learned

New Research Shows That It Interferes With the Synthesis and Function of BDNF, Derailing the Brain’s Center for Learning

Robert Klitzman

A patient who tested positive for the gene that leads to Huntington’s disease wrestled with a host of questions. Should she have children with her husband, knowing that each baby has a 50-50 chance of inheriting the mutation that causes the degenerative neurological illness?

Worldwide pandemics of influenza caused widespread death and illness in 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009. A new study examining weather patterns around the time of these pandemics finds that each of them was preceded by La Niña conditions in the equatorial Pacific.

Carl Hart (left), says that flawed research may be preventing meth addicts from getting effective treatment for substance abuse. Photo: Eve Vagg.

A review of recent research on methamphetamine use suggests that claims the drug causes significant cognitive prob

The first years of Matthew La Croix’s life were consumed with hospital visits.

Gay men lead healthier, less stress-filled lives when states offer legal protections to sa

Barron H. Lerner

Image credit: Margaret Fox Photography

It’s not every day that a professor buys a breathalyzer.

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