Race

Alondra Nelson Columbia Dean of Social Sciences

Photo by Jörg Meyer

Alondra Nelson was an eight-year-old when the television adaptation of Alex Haley’s Roots aired in 1977 to an audience of 130 million people. “We knew it was very important,” she said.

the audience at a "Women Creating Change" forum pose together in an auditorium

Attendees at the "What We CAN Do When There’s Nothing to Be Done: Strategies for Change" symposium gather in solidarity. Photo by Clark Jones

Columbia’s Center for the Study of Social Difference was created 10 years ago to support research on the effects of gender, race and other areas of inequality in a global context.

Maya Tolstoy

Maya Tolstoy, interim executive vice president and dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

A two-year study by the University on the status of women and underrepresented minority faculty at Columbia has resulted in a set of proposals on ways to close salary gaps, spur academic advancement and improve the overall work environment.

In late 1862, the French painter Édouard Manet recorded in his studio notebook that the model Laure posed for a portrait in his Paris studio.

Stepanie McCurry leaning on a stone wall in Columbia's Morningside campus

Photo by John Pinderhughes

Stephanie McCurry grew up in Belfast, surrounded by political violence. Her neighborhood was at the center of British occupation during “The Troubles,” the euphemism for sectarian strife between Northern Irish Catholics and Protestants that killed thousands in the 1970s and 80s.

Desmond Patton

Photo by John Pinderhughes

Prof. Desmond Patton looks at conflict, culture and language on social media and then develops algorithms to detect instances of aggression.
Alondra Nelson Columbia Dean of Social Sciences

Alondra Nelson, Columbia’s dean of social science and professor of sociology, will serve as faculty lead to the Atlantic Fellows program.

The program will empower and connect dynamic individuals committed to working together across disciplines and borders to advance fairer, healthier, more inclusive societies.
Fredrick Harris

With the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, race has become a defining issue in this election year, and mobilizing the African American vote will be the key to winning the presidency, says Fred Harris, a prof

Columbia President Lee C. Bollinger teaching.

Columbia President Lee C. Bollinger teaching.

When in June the Supreme Court issued a long-awaited ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas that upheld affirmative action in college admissions, the decision was widely hailed as a decisive victory recognizing the value of diversity in higher education.

Sociologist Carla Shedd, Columbia University, by Barbara Alper
Carla Shedd focuses her research on young people because their voices are missing from much sociological research. “I want to make visible the people who are most affected by policy.”

Pages