Science Digest

Elena Aprile leads the XENON collaboration, which has built the world’s largest and most sensitive device yet to look for evidence of weakly interacting massive dark matter particles, or WIMPs. (Symmetry magazine)

Elena Aprile, a physics professor at Columbia who is leading the world’s most sensitive search yet for dark matter, will receive the American Astronomical Society’s 2019 Berkeley Prize.
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By compressing layers of boron nitride and graphene, researchers were able to enhance the material's band gap, bringing it one step closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in today’s electronic devices.

A Columbia University-led international team of researchers has developed a technique to manipulate the electrical conductivity of graphene with compression, bringing the material one step closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in today’s electronic devices.

National Academy of Sciences logo

Two Columbia professors — a neuroscientist whose work on the visual system could lead to a cure for blindness and a theoretical computer scientist who has helped define the limits of efficient computation — are among the 84 new members elected this week to the National Academy of Sciences. 

Two Columbia professors — a neuroscientist whose work on the visual system could lead to a cure for blindness and a theoretical computer scientist who has helped define the limits of computation — are among the 84 new members elected this week to the National Academy of Sciences.
hydra image with neurons labeled with a green fluorescence indicator

Researchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. In the above image, hydra's neurons are labeled with a green fluorescence indicator. (Yuste Lab, Columbia University)

Researchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. By comparing Hydra’s behaviors to the firing of its neurons, the researchers hope to eventually understand how its nervous system, and that of more complex animals, works.
The project combines mapping techniques with Twitter-usage data to gain a real-time understanding of how people occupy public space.
Yaniv Erlich holds a framed picture of his father as a teenager

Columbia computer scientist Yaniv Erlich has assembled the world's largest family tree to date. He and his father (pictured as a teenager) are among the 86 million genealogy profiles Erlich and his colleagues drew from in their study. (MyHeritage)

From 86 million genealogy profiles, researchers have amassed the largest, scientifically-vetted family tree to date, which at 13 million people, is slightly bigger than a nation the size of Cuba or Belgium. Published in the journal Science, the new dataset offers fresh insights into the last 500 years of marriage and migration in Europe and North America, and the role of genes in longevity.

The Milky Way galaxy, perturbed by the tidal interaction with a dwarf galaxy, as predicted by N-body simulations. The locations of the observed stars above and below the disk, which are used to test the perturbation scenario, are indicated. CREDIT: T. MUELLER/C. LAPORTE/NASA/JPL-CALTECH

An international team of astronomers has discovered that some stars located in the Galactic halo surrounding the Milky Way - previously thought to be remnants of invading galaxies from the past - are instead former residents of the Galactic disk, kicked out by those invading dwarf galaxies

Assistant Professor of Astronomy David Kipping has been named a recipient of the prestigious 2018 Sloan Research Fellowship.

NYC street tree with guard

In a new study, Columbia researchers find that street trees with protective guards soaked up runoff water six times faster than trees without guards. (Rob Elliott, Columbia University)

In a new study, Columbia researchers find that street trees with protective guards soaked up runoff water six times faster than trees without guards.
In a new study in Science, researchers predict a rising number of asylum seekers to the European Union as global temperatures increase.

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