Insight on the Midterm Election 2018

August 28, 2018
  • banner of the American flag with the words "Insight on the Midterm Elections"
  • A Resource for Journalists

    The U.S. midterm elections will be held Tuesday, November 6. All 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 35 of the Senate's 100 seats are in play. Among the most important issues for U.S. voters are foreign policy, immigration, healthcare, the economy and education. Here are relevant faculty experts and resources at Columbia University available for journalists and the news media.

    Media Contacts:
    Sabina Lee
    Senior Public Affairs Officer
    212-854-5579
    sl3646@columbia.edu

    Caroline Harting
    Public Affairs Officer
    212-854-6164
    ceh2128@columbia.edu


  • Experts

    Maria Abascal

    Maria C. Abascal
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Email

    Maria Abascal, Assistant Professor of Sociology, is interested in intergroup relations and boundary processes, especially as they pertain to race, ethnicity and nationalism. Her research interest includes exploring the impact of Hispanic population growth––real and perceived––on relations between Blacks and Whites in the United States based on a range of quantitative methods and data sources, including original lab, survey, and field experiments.

    Charles K. Armstrong

    Charles Armstrong
    The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies
    Email

    Charles Armstrong, The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences in the Department of History, specializes in modern Korean and East Asian history and US policy in Asia. His latest books include Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950-1992 (Cornell, 2013) and The Koreas (Routledge, second edition 2014). He is completing a history of modern East Asia for the Wiley-Blackwell Concise History of the Modern World series, to be published in 2019.

    Jelani Cobb

    Jelani Cobb
    Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism
    Email

    Jelani Cobb is the Ira Lipman Professor of Journalism. He is also the director of the Ira Lipman Journalism and Civil and Human Rights Center that is dedicated to advancing the mission of civil rights coverage, especially in the United States. He has contributed to The New Yorker since 2012, and became a staff writer in 2015. He writes frequently about race, politics, history and culture. He is the author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.

    Andrew Gelman

    Andrew Gelman
    Higgins Professor of Statistics
    Email

    Andrew Gelman, a professor of statistics and political science and director of Columbia’s Applied Statistics Center, has researched a range of topics, including: why it is rational to vote; why campaign polls are so variable when elections are so predictable; why redistricting is good for democracy; reversals of death sentences; police stops in New York City; the statistical challenges of estimating small effects; the probability that one vote will be decisive; seats and votes in Congress; and social network structure, etc. His books include Bayesian Data Analysis; Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks; and Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State: Why Americans Vote the Way They Do.

    Michael Gerrard

    Michael Gerrard
    Andrew Sabin Professor of Professional Practice
    Email

    Michael Gerrard is an environmental lawyer and director of Columbia Law School’s Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, which he founded in 2009 to develop legal techniques to fight climate change. He also chairs the faculty of Columbia University’s Earth Institute. From 1979 through 2008, he practiced environmental law in New York, most recently as partner in charge of the New York office of the firm now known as Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer. Upon joining the Law School faculty in 2009, he became the firm’s senior counsel.

    Michael Graetz

    Michael Graetz
    Columbia Alumni Professor of Tax Law
    Email

    Michael Graetz, who joined Columbia Law School from Yale in 2009, was assistant to the secretary and special counsel for the U.S. Department of the Treasury in 1992 and deputy assistant secretary for tax policy in 1990 and 1991. He is the author of numerous articles and several books, including 100 Million Unnecessary Returns: A Simple, Fair, and Competitive Tax Plan for the United States.

    Donald Green

    Donald Green
    Burgess Professor of Political Science
    Email

    Donald P. Green, J.W. Burgess Professor of Political Science, is the author of four books and more than 100 essays. Green's research interests include voting behavior, partisanship, campaign finance, hate crime, and research methods. Much of his current work uses field experimentation to study the ways in which political campaigns mobilize and persuade voters.

    Farah Jasmine Griffin

    Farah Jasmine Griffin
    William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature;
    African American Studies
    Email

    Farah Jasmine Griffin is the William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies and is the director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia. She also serves as Program Director for The Schomburg Center's Scholars-in-Residence Program. Her major fields of interest are American and African-American literature, music, and history.

    Fredrick Harris

    Fred Harris
    Professor of Political Science;
    Dean for Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
    Email

    Fredrick C. Harris, Dean of Social Science and Professor of Political Science, also serves as Director of the Center on African American Politics and Society. His research interests include American politics with a focus on race and politics, political participation, social movements, religion and politics, political development, and African-American politics. His publications include Something Within: Religion in African-American Political Activism, Countervailing Forces in African-American Civic Activism,1973-1994 with Valeria Sinclair-Chapman and Brian McKenzie.

    Jason Healey

    Jason Healey
    Senior Research Scholar in the Faculty of International and Public Affairs;
    Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Jason Healey, one of the pioneers of cyber threat intelligence across the public and private sectors, is a Senior Research Scholar at SIPA. He served as the founding director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council and Director for Cyber Infrastructure Protection at the White House (from 2003 to 2005), where he helped advise the President and coordinated US efforts to secure US cyberspace and critical infrastructure. He was the editor of the first history of conflict in cyberspace, A Fierce Domain: Cyber Conflict, 1986 to 2012.

    Jameel Jaffer

    Jameel Jaffer
    Executive Director, Knight First Amendment Institute
    Email

    Jameel Jaffer is the Knight First Amendment Institute’s inaugural director. He previously served as deputy legal director at the ACLU, where he oversaw the organization’s work on free speech, privacy, technology, national security, and international human rights. Jaffer has litigated some of the most significant post-9/11 cases relating to national security and civil liberties and is one of the nation's leading advocates for government transparency. At Knight, he is currently leading his team in protecting public discourse in the digital age, strengthening legal frameworks for government transparency, and reviving the First Amendment as a constraint on government surveillance.

    Olatunde Johnson

    Olatunde Johnson
    Jerome B. Sherman Professor of Law
    Email

    Olatunde Johnson is an expert in civil rights and constitutional governance at Columbia Law School. She joined the Law School faculty in 2006 after serving as counsel to U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy on the Senate Judiciary Committee and working for the ACLU and the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. She was a law clerk for David Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens. She has a J.D. degree from Stanford and a B.A. from Yale.

    Kopczuk Wojciech

    Wojciech Kopczuk
    Professor of Economics and International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Wojciech Kopczuk, professor of economics and international and public affairs, has researched issues related to tax policy, income and wealth inequality. His work has been published in top economics journals, including American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Political Economy and Review of Economic Studies. He is a co-editor of the Journal of Public Economics and associate editor of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.

    Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee
    Professor of Sociology
    Email

    Jennifer Lee, professor of sociology and author of award-winning books and articles about immigration, the new second generation, education, and race relations, has published dozens of articles about race/ethnicity, immigration, and the second generation. Her most recent books include The Asian American Achievement Paradox (with Min Zhou) and Civility in the City: Blacks, Jews, and Koreans in Urban America. She co-authored The Diversity Paradox: Immigration and the Color Line in 21st Century (with Frank D. Bean). She is also co-editor of Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity.

    Kimberly Marten

    Kimberly Marten
    Professor and Department Chair of Political Science, Barnard College
    Email

    Kimberly Marten chairs the political science department at Barnard and directs the Program on U.S.-Russia Relations at Columbia's Harriman Institute. She is a member of Columbia's Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies. Her latest academic discourse includes Putin's decision to meddle in the 2016 U.S. elections and the causes and effects of NATO enlargement. She has supported a measured U.S. policy toward NATO/Russia relations, and a limited U.S.-Russia cyber accord.

    Elora Mukherjee

    Elora Mukherjee
    Jerome L. Greene Clinical Professor of Law
    Email

    Elora Mukherjee is director of the Columbia Law School’s Immigration Rights Clinic. She came to the Law School as a fellow in 2013 and joined the faculty the following year. She previously was a staff attorney at the ACLU, where, among other things, she worked on behalf of immigrant children and their parents in Texas detention facilities. She is a founder and director of the Refugee Reunification Project, which provides grants to help refugee families purchase plane tickets to safety in the U.S., and a director of the Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project at the Urban Justice Center in New York.

    Mae Ngai

    Mae Ngai
    Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies;
    Professor of History
    Email

    Mae M. Ngai is a foremost expert in the history of US immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. Author of the award winning books, she has published Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America. Her pending publications include The Chinese Question, a study of Chinese gold miners and racial politics in nineteenth-century California, Australia, and South Africa; and Nation of Immigrants: A Short History of an Idea.

    Sharyn O'Halloran

    Sharyn O'Halloran
    George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economics and Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Sharyn O’Halloran is an expert in trade policy and regulations. She has consulted with the World Bank’s International Finance Group and its Regulation and Competition Policy Group on the impact of trade and political institutions on economic growth and performance. O’Halloran has also written extensively on issues related to the political economy of international trade and finance, regulation and institutional reform, economic growth and democratic transitions, and the political representation of minorities.

    Justin H. Phillips

    Justin H. Phillips
    Associate Professor of Political Science
    Email

    Justin H. Phillips, a faculty fellow at the Applied Statistics Center and at the Institute for Social and Economic Research, has studied the effects of public opinion on sub-national policy making and evaluating the power of state governors in negotiations with legislatures. His primary areas of interest include American state and local politics and public opinion; the responsiveness of state governments to voter preferences and the manner in which responsiveness is shaped by institutions, political polarization, and interest group power. His most recent publication includes the book, The Power of American Governors.

    Samuel Roberts

    Sam Roberts
    Associate Professor of History and of Sociomedical Sciences
    Email

    Samuel K. Roberts, Jr. has been a leading scholar on African-American history, medical and public health history, urban history, issues of policing and criminal justice, and the history of social movements. He is a member of the Mailman School of Public Health’s Working Group on Public Health and Mass Incarceration, and the organizer of the Columbia University Institute for Research in African American Studies conference titled, Challenging Punishment: Race, the People’s Health, and the War on Drugs (October 2013).

    Michael Sparer

    Michael Sparer
    Health Policy and Management Department Chair
    Email

    Michael Sparer, who has a J.D. degree from Rutgers and a Ph.D. in political science from Brandeis, joined the Mailman School of Public Health in 1991. He is the author of Medicaid and the Limits of State Health Reform, and former editor of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and the Law. His current projects include a study of the rise (and demise) of most of the non-profit insurance “cooperatives” created by the Affordable Care Act, an analysis of the cross-national politics of public health, and an examination of political and policy implications of permitting all Americans to buy-into Medicaid.

    Sarah Stillman

    Sarah Stillman
    Project Director, Global Migration Project
    Email

    Sarah Stillman directs the Global Migration Project, which offers several reporting fellows the opportunity to pursue stories on gender and migration, focusing on U.S. immigration law, border politics, international refugee policy, and more. She was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship and is a staff writer for The New Yorker. She is currently reporting on immigration and criminal justice issues.

    Identity

    Maria Abascal

    Maria C. Abascal
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Email

    Maria Abascal, Assistant Professor of Sociology, is interested in intergroup relations and boundary processes, especially as they pertain to race, ethnicity and nationalism. Her research interest includes exploring the impact of Hispanic population growth––real and perceived––on relations between Blacks and Whites in the United States based on a range of quantitative methods and data sources, including original lab, survey, and field experiments.

    Jelani Cobb

    Jelani Cobb
    Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism
    Email

    Jelani Cobb is the Ira Lipman Professor of Journalism. He is also the director of the Ira Lipman Journalism and Civil and Human Rights Center that is dedicated to advancing the mission of civil rights coverage, especially in the United States. He has contributed to The New Yorker since 2012, and became a staff writer in 2015. He writes frequently about race, politics, history and culture. He is the author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.

    Farah Jasmine Griffin

    Farah Jasmine Griffin
    William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature;
    African American Studies
    Email

    Farah Jasmine Griffin is the William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies and is the director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia. She also serves as Program Director for The Schomburg Center's Scholars-in-Residence Program. Her major fields of interest are American and African-American literature, music, and history.

    Fredrick Harris

    Fred Harris
    Professor of Political Science;
    Dean for Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
    Email

    Fredrick C. Harris, Dean of Social Science and Professor of Political Science, also serves as Director of the Center on African American Politics and Society. His research interests include American politics with a focus on race and politics, political participation, social movements, religion and politics, political development, and African-American politics. His publications include Something Within: Religion in African-American Political Activism, Countervailing Forces in African-American Civic Activism,1973-1994 with Valeria Sinclair-Chapman and Brian McKenzie.

    Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee
    Professor of Sociology
    Email

    Jennifer Lee, professor of sociology and author of award-winning books and articles about immigration, the new second generation, education, and race relations, has published dozens of articles about race/ethnicity, immigration, and the second generation. Her most recent books include The Asian American Achievement Paradox (with Min Zhou) and Civility in the City: Blacks, Jews, and Koreans in Urban America. She co-authored The Diversity Paradox: Immigration and the Color Line in 21st Century (with Frank D. Bean). She is also co-editor of Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity.

    Media

    Jelani Cobb

    Jelani Cobb
    Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism
    Email

    Jelani Cobb is the Ira Lipman Professor of Journalism. He is also the director of the Ira Lipman Journalism and Civil and Human Rights Center that is dedicated to advancing the mission of civil rights coverage, especially in the United States. He has contributed to The New Yorker since 2012, and became a staff writer in 2015. He writes frequently about race, politics, history and culture. He is the author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.

    Donald Green

    Donald Green
    Burgess Professor of Political Science
    Email

    Donald P. Green, J.W. Burgess Professor of Political Science, is the author of four books and more than 100 essays. Green's research interests include voting behavior, partisanship, campaign finance, hate crime, and research methods. Much of his current work uses field experimentation to study the ways in which political campaigns mobilize and persuade voters.

    Jameel Jaffer

    Jameel Jaffer
    Executive Director, Knight First Amendment Institute
    Email

    Jameel Jaffer is the Knight First Amendment Institute’s inaugural director. He previously served as deputy legal director at the ACLU, where he oversaw the organization’s work on free speech, privacy, technology, national security, and international human rights. Jaffer has litigated some of the most significant post-9/11 cases relating to national security and civil liberties and is one of the nation's leading advocates for government transparency. At Knight, he is currently leading his team in protecting public discourse in the digital age, strengthening legal frameworks for government transparency, and reviving the First Amendment as a constraint on government surveillance.

    Justin H. Phillips

    Justin H. Phillips
    Associate Professor of Political Science
    Email

    Justin H. Phillips, a faculty fellow at the Applied Statistics Center and at the Institute for Social and Economic Research, has studied the effects of public opinion on sub-national policy making and evaluating the power of state governors in negotiations with legislatures. His primary areas of interest include American state and local politics and public opinion; the responsiveness of state governments to voter preferences and the manner in which responsiveness is shaped by institutions, political polarization, and interest group power. His most recent publication includes the book, The Power of American Governors.

    Sarah Stillman

    Sarah Stillman
    Project Director, Global Migration Project
    Email

    Sarah Stillman directs the Global Migration Project, which offers several reporting fellows the opportunity to pursue stories on gender and migration, focusing on U.S. immigration law, border politics, international refugee policy, and more. She was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship and is a staff writer for The New Yorker. She is currently reporting on immigration and criminal justice issues.

    Immigration

    Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee
    Professor of Sociology
    Email

    Jennifer Lee, professor of sociology and author of award-winning books and articles about immigration, the new second generation, education, and race relations, has published dozens of articles about race/ethnicity, immigration, and the second generation. Her most recent books include The Asian American Achievement Paradox (with Min Zhou) and Civility in the City: Blacks, Jews, and Koreans in Urban America. She co-authored The Diversity Paradox: Immigration and the Color Line in 21st Century (with Frank D. Bean). She is also co-editor of Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity.

    Elora Mukherjee

    Elora Mukherjee
    Jerome L. Greene Clinical Professor of Law
    Email

    Elora Mukherjee is director of the Columbia Law School’s Immigration Rights Clinic. She came to the Law School as a fellow in 2013 and joined the faculty the following year. She previously was a staff attorney at the ACLU, where, among other things, she worked on behalf of immigrant children and their parents in Texas detention facilities. She is a founder and director of the Refugee Reunification Project, which provides grants to help refugee families purchase plane tickets to safety in the U.S., and a director of the Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project at the Urban Justice Center in New York.

    Mae Ngai

    Mae Ngai
    Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies;
    Professor of History
    Email

    Mae M. Ngai is a foremost expert in the history of US immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. Author of the award winning books, she has published Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America. Her pending publications include The Chinese Question, a study of Chinese gold miners and racial politics in nineteenth-century California, Australia, and South Africa; and Nation of Immigrants: A Short History of an Idea.

    Sarah Stillman

    Sarah Stillman
    Project Director, Global Migration Project
    Email

    Sarah Stillman directs the Global Migration Project, which offers several reporting fellows the opportunity to pursue stories on gender and migration, focusing on U.S. immigration law, border politics, international refugee policy, and more. She was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship and is a staff writer for The New Yorker. She is currently reporting on immigration and criminal justice issues.

    Foreign Policy

    Charles K. Armstrong

    Charles Armstrong
    The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies
    Email

    Charles Armstrong, The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences in the Department of History, specializes in modern Korean and East Asian history and US policy in Asia. His latest books include Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950-1992 (Cornell, 2013) and The Koreas (Routledge, second edition 2014). He is completing a history of modern East Asia for the Wiley-Blackwell Concise History of the Modern World series, to be published in 2019.

    Jason Healey

    Jason Healey
    Senior Research Scholar in the Faculty of International and Public Affairs;
    Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Jason Healey, one of the pioneers of cyber threat intelligence across the public and private sectors, is a Senior Research Scholar at SIPA. He served as the founding director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council and Director for Cyber Infrastructure Protection at the White House (from 2003 to 2005), where he helped advise the President and coordinated US efforts to secure US cyberspace and critical infrastructure. He was the editor of the first history of conflict in cyberspace, A Fierce Domain: Cyber Conflict, 1986 to 2012.

    Kimberly Marten

    Kimberly Marten
    Professor and Department Chair of Political Science, Barnard College
    Email

    Kimberly Marten chairs the political science department at Barnard and directs the Program on U.S.-Russia Relations at Columbia's Harriman Institute. She is a member of Columbia's Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies. Her latest academic discourse includes Putin's decision to meddle in the 2016 U.S. elections and the causes and effects of NATO enlargement. She has supported a measured U.S. policy toward NATO/Russia relations, and a limited U.S.-Russia cyber accord.

    Sharyn O'Halloran

    Sharyn O'Halloran
    George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economics and Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Sharyn O’Halloran is an expert in trade policy and regulations. She has consulted with the World Bank’s International Finance Group and its Regulation and Competition Policy Group on the impact of trade and political institutions on economic growth and performance. O’Halloran has also written extensively on issues related to the political economy of international trade and finance, regulation and institutional reform, economic growth and democratic transitions, and the political representation of minorities.

    Healthcare

    Samuel Roberts

    Sam Roberts
    Associate Professor of History and of Sociomedical Sciences
    Email

    Samuel K. Roberts, Jr. has been a leading scholar on African-American history, medical and public health history, urban history, issues of policing and criminal justice, and the history of social movements. He is a member of the Mailman School of Public Health’s Working Group on Public Health and Mass Incarceration, and the organizer of the Columbia University Institute for Research in African American Studies conference titled, Challenging Punishment: Race, the People’s Health, and the War on Drugs (October 2013).

    Michael Sparer

    Michael Sparer
    Health Policy and Management Department Chair
    Email

    Michael Sparer, who has a J.D. degree from Rutgers and a Ph.D. in political science from Brandeis, joined the Mailman School of Public Health in 1991. He is the author of Medicaid and the Limits of State Health Reform, and former editor of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and the Law. His current projects include a study of the rise (and demise) of most of the non-profit insurance “cooperatives” created by the Affordable Care Act, an analysis of the cross-national politics of public health, and an examination of political and policy implications of permitting all Americans to buy-into Medicaid.

    Analytics

    Maria Abascal

    Maria C. Abascal
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Email

    Maria Abascal, Assistant Professor of Sociology, is interested in intergroup relations and boundary processes, especially as they pertain to race, ethnicity and nationalism. Her research interest includes exploring the impact of Hispanic population growth––real and perceived––on relations between Blacks and Whites in the United States based on a range of quantitative methods and data sources, including original lab, survey, and field experiments.

    Donald Green

    Donald Green
    Burgess Professor of Political Science
    Email

    Donald P. Green, J.W. Burgess Professor of Political Science, is the author of four books and more than 100 essays. Green's research interests include voting behavior, partisanship, campaign finance, hate crime, and research methods. Much of his current work uses field experimentation to study the ways in which political campaigns mobilize and persuade voters.

    Andrew Gelman

    Andrew Gelman
    Higgins Professor of Statistics
    Email

    Andrew Gelman, a professor of statistics and political science and director of Columbia’s Applied Statistics Center, has researched a range of topics, including: why it is rational to vote; why campaign polls are so variable when elections are so predictable; why redistricting is good for democracy; reversals of death sentences; police stops in New York City; the statistical challenges of estimating small effects; the probability that one vote will be decisive; seats and votes in Congress; and social network structure, etc. His books include Bayesian Data Analysis; Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks; and Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State: Why Americans Vote the Way They Do.

    Fredrick Harris

    Fred Harris
    Professor of Political Science;
    Dean for Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
    Email

    Fredrick C. Harris, Dean of Social Science and Professor of Political Science, also serves as Director of the Center on African American Politics and Society. His research interests include American politics with a focus on race and politics, political participation, social movements, religion and politics, political development, and African-American politics. His publications include Something Within: Religion in African-American Political Activism, Countervailing Forces in African-American Civic Activism,1973-1994 with Valeria Sinclair-Chapman and Brian McKenzie.

    Justin H. Phillips

    Justin H. Phillips
    Associate Professor of Political Science
    Email

    Justin H. Phillips, a faculty fellow at the Applied Statistics Center and at the Institute for Social and Economic Research, has studied the effects of public opinion on sub-national policy making and evaluating the power of state governors in negotiations with legislatures. His primary areas of interest include American state and local politics and public opinion; the responsiveness of state governments to voter preferences and the manner in which responsiveness is shaped by institutions, political polarization, and interest group power. His most recent publication includes the book, The Power of American Governors.

    Justice

    Jelani Cobb

    Jelani Cobb
    Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism
    Email

    Jelani Cobb is the Ira Lipman Professor of Journalism. He is also the director of the Ira Lipman Journalism and Civil and Human Rights Center that is dedicated to advancing the mission of civil rights coverage, especially in the United States. He has contributed to The New Yorker since 2012, and became a staff writer in 2015. He writes frequently about race, politics, history and culture. He is the author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.

    Donald Green

    Donald Green
    Burgess Professor of Political Science
    Email

    Donald P. Green, J.W. Burgess Professor of Political Science, is the author of four books and more than 100 essays. Green's research interests include voting behavior, partisanship, campaign finance, hate crime, and research methods. Much of his current work uses field experimentation to study the ways in which political campaigns mobilize and persuade voters.

    Olatunde Johnson

    Olatunde Johnson
    Jerome B. Sherman Professor of Law
    Email

    Olatunde Johnson is an expert in civil rights and constitutional governance at Columbia Law School. She joined the Law School faculty in 2006 after serving as counsel to U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy on the Senate Judiciary Committee and working for the ACLU and the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. She was a law clerk for David Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens. She has a J.D. degree from Stanford and a B.A. from Yale.

    Elora Mukherjee

    Elora Mukherjee
    Jerome L. Greene Clinical Professor of Law
    Email

    Elora Mukherjee is director of the Columbia Law School’s Immigration Rights Clinic. She came to the Law School as a fellow in 2013 and joined the faculty the following year. She previously was a staff attorney at the ACLU, where, among other things, she worked on behalf of immigrant children and their parents in Texas detention facilities. She is a founder and director of the Refugee Reunification Project, which provides grants to help refugee families purchase plane tickets to safety in the U.S., and a director of the Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project at the Urban Justice Center in New York.

    Samuel Roberts

    Sam Roberts
    Associate Professor of History and of Sociomedical Sciences
    Email

    Samuel K. Roberts, Jr. has been a leading scholar on African-American history, medical and public health history, urban history, issues of policing and criminal justice, and the history of social movements. He is a member of the Mailman School of Public Health’s Working Group on Public Health and Mass Incarceration, and the organizer of the Columbia University Institute for Research in African American Studies conference titled, Challenging Punishment: Race, the People’s Health, and the War on Drugs (October 2013).

    Technology

    Jason Healey

    Jason Healey
    Senior Research Scholar in the Faculty of International and Public Affairs;
    Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Jason Healey, one of the pioneers of cyber threat intelligence across the public and private sectors, is a Senior Research Scholar at SIPA. He served as the founding director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council and Director for Cyber Infrastructure Protection at the White House (from 2003 to 2005), where he helped advise the President and coordinated US efforts to secure US cyberspace and critical infrastructure. He was the editor of the first history of conflict in cyberspace, A Fierce Domain: Cyber Conflict, 1986 to 2012.

    Jameel Jaffer

    Jameel Jaffer
    Executive Director, Knight First Amendment Institute
    Email

    Jameel Jaffer is the Knight First Amendment Institute’s inaugural director. He previously served as deputy legal director at the ACLU, where he oversaw the organization’s work on free speech, privacy, technology, national security, and international human rights. Jaffer has litigated some of the most significant post-9/11 cases relating to national security and civil liberties and is one of the nation's leading advocates for government transparency. At Knight, he is currently leading his team in protecting public discourse in the digital age, strengthening legal frameworks for government transparency, and reviving the First Amendment as a constraint on government surveillance.

    Economy

    Michael Graetz

    Michael Graetz
    Columbia Alumni Professor of Tax Law
    Email

    Michael Graetz, who joined Columbia Law School from Yale in 2009, was assistant to the secretary and special counsel for the U.S. Department of the Treasury in 1992 and deputy assistant secretary for tax policy in 1990 and 1991. He is the author of numerous articles and several books, including 100 Million Unnecessary Returns: A Simple, Fair, and Competitive Tax Plan for the United States.

    Sharyn O'Halloran

    Sharyn O'Halloran
    George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economics and Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Sharyn O’Halloran is an expert in trade policy and regulations. She has consulted with the World Bank’s International Finance Group and its Regulation and Competition Policy Group on the impact of trade and political institutions on economic growth and performance. O’Halloran has also written extensively on issues related to the political economy of international trade and finance, regulation and institutional reform, economic growth and democratic transitions, and the political representation of minorities.

    Kopczuk Wojciech

    Wojciech Kopczuk
    Professor of Economics and International and Public Affairs
    Email

    Wojciech Kopczuk, professor of economics and international and public affairs, has researched issues related to tax policy, income and wealth inequality. His work has been published in top economics journals, including American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Political Economy and Review of Economic Studies. He is a co-editor of the Journal of Public Economics and associate editor of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.

    Climate

    Michael Gerrard

    Michael Gerrard
    Andrew Sabin Professor of Professional Practice
    Email

    Michael Gerrard is an environmental lawyer and director of Columbia Law School’s Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, which he founded in 2009 to develop legal techniques to fight climate change. He also chairs the faculty of Columbia University’s Earth Institute. From 1979 through 2008, he practiced environmental law in New York, most recently as partner in charge of the New York office of the firm now known as Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer. Upon joining the Law School faculty in 2009, he became the firm’s senior counsel.