NewYorkStories

David Dinkins Archives Columbia University

Photo by Michael Dames

The life and career of New York’s first African American mayor, David N. Dinkins, is one for the history books. Now, there will be no better place than Columbia for scholars looking to write them.

Miller inaugurates a new holiday tradition, a playful production that brings to life Saint-Saëns’ musical “salute to feathers, fur, and fins”—Carnival of the Animals. A modern twist on Victorian toy theater, this imaginative staging combines music, scenic elements, puppetry, and movement, plus the clever verses of Ogden Nash. Curtain-raisers from the 16th Century to present-day set the stage and kindle the spirit of the holidays.

Astronomy Students Rooftop Variables Program Columbia University

Rings of Saturn, moons of Jupiter, the constellation Cassiopeia. Young students are reaching for the stars and planets, with Columbia’s help.

Double Discovery 50th Anniversary Columbia University
Five decades ago, a pair of Columbia undergraduates recognized striking inequality in access to higher education, so Roger Lehecka and Steven J. Weinberg sought to overcome this divide by exposing local high school students to the rigor of Columbia.

The seminar in 401 Hamilton Hall focused on classic literary texts, including Homer’s Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Othello, and W.E.B. Du Bois’ The Souls of Black Folk. But this was no ordinary summer school class, and its students were not traditional collegians.

The Community Scholars Program offers independent, community-based scholars from Northern Manhattan access to a suite of Columbia University services and resources that allows them to complete a particular project or attain skills in a particular area. The program helps to foster and deepen ties between the University and the many independent members of the cultural and intellectual community surrounding it.

(Editor's Note: On October 26-27, 2015, Columbia honored the 60th anniversary of Arthur Mitchell's debut with a two-day symposium, including a documentary screening and a conversation with Mitchell. Learn more.)

Literary Lions at Columbia University

They write books, poems, scripts, essays, librettos and screenplays. Their works have been published around the world and produced in venues from Broadway to Hollywood, and everywhere in between. Their plots and characters, images and ideas have captured the imagination of tens of millions of readers and viewers.

African American artist Romare Bearden’s iconic series of works based on Homer’s "The Odyssey" was featured at Columbia's Wallach Art Gallery. Watch how the exhibition connects with the Columbia and Harlem community.

From left: Garrett Fitzgerald and Rob van Haaren in the Rockaways after Hurricane Sandy

Back in 2010, when graduation still seemed remote and intangible, Rob van Haaren and Garrett Fitzgerald agreed to celebrate their Ph.Ds—whenever they might finish—by piloting a pair of motorcycles from New York City to California. Van Haaren was from Holland, and he wanted to see the country.

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