NewYorkStories

(Editor's note: This story was originally published on April 20, 2011. The video was published on Feb. 20, 2013.)

Columbia University Medical Center has launched a new medical practice near Rockefeller Center, giving the commuters and visitors who stream into midtown Manhattan easy access to some of the city’s top practitioners.

Columbia’s campuses were largely spared the ravages of Hurricane Sandy, which destroyed neighborhoods, flooded tunnels, forced hospitals evacuations and knocked out power to millions throughout the region. But many in the tri-state area face a challenging path to recovery.

For two days in October, more than 20 executives of nonprofit groups in Harlem came together at Columbia Business School for a leadership training program. To Professor Ray Horton, who joined the faculty in 1970, the new Strengthening West Harlem Nonprofits program represents the ideal alignment of University expertise and his own longstanding commitment to serving the local community.

Irving Boyer, Prospect Park, ca. 1942–1944. Oil on academy board. Image credit: New-York Historical Society, Gift of Selwyn L. Boyer, from the Boyer Family Collection

New York City played a critical role in the national war effort during World War II, with the city’s workers doing everything from building ships at the Brooklyn Navy Yard to manufacturing uniforms at Brooks Brothers.

Shattered boardwalk lining Rockaway Beach Boulevard Image credit: Maura R. O'Connor/The New York World

Researchers at Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have been explaining to the media and public how weather systems converged to make Sandy so powerful, and how the rising sea levels caused by climate change have sharply increased the destructive potential from such storms on the New York region.

As an intern in Columbia’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML), Jean-Christophe Cloutier was used to the silence. But he could barely contain himself the day he stumbled on what appeared to be a previously unknown manuscript by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay in the archives of another writer.

Principal Jeanene Worrell-Breeden welcomed an audience of more than 300 parents, teachers, neighborhood residents and university community members—along with local and state dignitaries—to celebrate Teachers College Community School’s move into its permanent new home.

Principal Jeanene Worrell-Breeden welcomed an audience of more than 300 parents, teachers, neighborhood residents and university community members—along with local and state dignitaries—to celebrate Teachers College Community School’s move into its permanent new home.

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger issued the following statement today celebrating the life of Arthur Ochs "Punch" Sulzberger:

"The entire Columbia community mourns the loss of Arthur Ochs 'Punch' Sulzberger. He was a loyal and devoted College alumnus and trustee, the son of a great Columbia family whose name and generosity graces programs, structures and scholarships across the entire University.

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