Science Digest

Neutron Star Merger

Courtesy of NASA

Brian Metzger won the $100,000 prize — awarded by the Breakthrough Prize Foundation to early-career researchers — for his pioneering predictions of the electromagnetic signal from a neutron star merger and for leadership in the emerging field of multi-messenger astronomy.
Rafael Yuste

Photo courtesy of Columbia University

Rafael Yuste, a leader in the development of neurotechnologies that could cure many mental and neurological diseases, is also spearheading a worldwide effort to ensure these powerful tools are used ethically.
Ravi Tomer
Raju Tomer has won a NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, for his pioneering work in developing new technologies for high-resolution mapping of brain structure and function.

Arthur Ashkin, May 27, 1947. Photo courtesy Columbia University Archives

Ashkin, 96, is the oldest person ever named a Nobel laureate in any category. His achievement allowed scientists to use pressure from light to manipulate tiny organisms without damaging them, “an old dream of science fiction.”

In a milestone for earthquake forecasting, researchers unveil the first physics-based model of California earthquake hazards to replicate estimates from the state’s leading statistical model. In the above radar image, a section of California's San Andreas fault can be seen below the Crystal Springs Reservoir (in black), with San Francisco (in pink) to the east. (Image: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

In a new study in Science Advances, researchers report that their physics-based model of California earthquake hazards replicated estimates from the state’s leading statistical model.

Researchers found clumps of non-functioning hnRNP H and at least three other RNA-binding proteins in the brain cells of people who had died with ALS, frontotemporal dementia or both. Bright red clumps of hnRNP H can be seen in the spinal cord motor neurons at left. Healthy neurons are shown at right. (Images: Aarti Sharma /Columbia University) 

Some forms of ALS and frontotemporal dementia share a common loss of functioning of RNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression, says a new study by Columbia University and New York Genome Center researchers.

In a new study, astronomers show how gas expelled in the merger of two small galaxies can linger across vast distances for billions of years, where it may eventually feed gas to more massive galaxies to make new stars. The Large Magellanic Cloud and the Small Magellanic Cloud pictured above are a pair of dwarf galaxies that were in the process of merging when they fell into the Milky Way. Their gas is expected to replenish half of the gas consumed by our galaxy as it forms new stars. (Photo: S. Brunier/European Southern Observatory)

 

In a new study, astronomers show how gas expelled in the merger of two small galaxies can linger across vast distances for billions of years, where it may eventually feed gas to more massive galaxies to make new stars.
living cell visualized with deuterium-labeled SRS imaging

A team of Columbia researchers show that a widely used chemical tracer, combined with a cutting-edge microscope, can track metabolic changes within the living cells of animals.

A team of Columbia researchers show that a widely used chemical tracer, combined with a cutting-edge microscope, can track metabolic changes within the living cells of animals.

The magma that feeds volcanoes beneath Earth’s surface is a mix of solid particles, liquid melt and gas bubbles. Successfully predicting whether lava from an erupting volcano will ooze out slowly or in a sudden and potentially deadly explosion has long vexed scientists.

EEG experiment led by Andrew Goldman

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, says a new study led by Andrew Goldman, a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University (pictured). 

Skilled improvisers were better than musicians with limited improvisational experience at distinguishing between chords that can be used interchangeably in a piece of music and those that cannot, a new study by Columbia researchers finds. The results suggest that musical improvisation, like so many other skills, improves with practice as the brain learns to categorize musical structures in a new way.

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