New Study by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Predicts Widespread Drought Risk by 2100

Increasing heat is expected to extend dry conditions to far more farmland and cities by the end of the century than changes in rainfall alone, says a new study from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Much of the concern about future drought under global warming has focused on rainfall projections, but higher evaporation rates may also play an important role as warmer temperatures wring more moisture from the soil, even in some places where rainfall is forecasted to increase, say the researchers.

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Climate Researchers Collect New Zealand Dust to Gauge Its Affect on Ice Age

Bess Koffman, a postdoctoral researcher at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, traveled to the rugged mountains of New Zealand’s South Island to collect dust.

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Researchers Discover Climate Conditions Help Forecast Meningitis Outbreaks

New research on meningitis incidence in sub-Saharan Africa pinpoints wind and dust conditions as predictors of the disease. The results may help in developing vaccination strategies that aim to prevent meningitis outbreaks, such as the 1996-1997 epidemic that killed 25,000 people.

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Lamont-Doherty researchers find parts of the Pacific are warming 15 times faster than in past 10,000 years
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