Columbia Commencement in Morningside Heights

The Class of 2018, a diverse group of some 16,000 men and women, receives degrees on May 16. They come from more than 100 different countries, and they range in age from 16 to 69.

Sevil Sabancı, a board member of Sabancı University, Güler Sabancı, chairperson of Sabancı Holding, and Columbia President Lee C. Bollinger at the launch of the Sakıp Sabancı Center for Turkish Studies.

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By compressing layers of boron nitride and graphene, researchers were able to enhance the material's band gap, bringing it one step closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in today’s electronic devices.

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Dusk in the desert behind a solar panel

Solar panels for smallholder farming irrigation pumps in Senegal, which are part of the “Acacia Irrigation” system developed by the Quadracci Sustainable Engineering Lab at Columbia University’s School of Engineering.

Columbia World Projects issued its first report on the results of its inaugural forum convened to identify ways in which academia and practitioners might partner to address significant challenges facing humanity.
Ramin Bahrani, Michael B. Jordan, Michael Shannon

Director Ramin Bahrani (left) stands with the lead actors in a film adaptation of 'Fahrenheit 451,' Michael B. Jordan and Michael Shannon. Photo by Michael Gibson/HBO

Ramin Bahrani's film, a modern retelling of Ray Bradbury’s dystopian classic was produced for HBO and will also screen at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.
Jeannette Wing in a beige suit, in a white, well-lit room

From filter bubbles to fake news, data-driven algorithms have developed a reputation problem. Jeannette Wing wants to change that.

hydra image with neurons labeled with a green fluorescence indicator

Researchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. In the above image, hydra's neurons are labeled with a green fluorescence indicator. (Yuste Lab, Columbia University)

Researchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. By comparing Hydra’s behaviors to the firing of its neurons, the researchers hope to eventually understand how its nervous system, and that of more complex animals, works.