Africa

From 19th-century studio practice through the independence era of the 1950s and 1960s, African photography has best been known for modes of portraiture that crystallize subjects’ identities and social milieus.

Tunisian electors waiting to vote in the October 2014 elections. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Alfred Stepan has been called the democracy whisperer. As the Wallace Sayre Professor of Government, he’s been watching, advising and studying government and democracy for over 40 years.

by Michael Shirber, for Astrobiology Magazine Wind and dust conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa can help predict a meningitis epidemic. Determining the role of climate in the spread of certain diseases can assist health officials in “forecasting” epidemics.

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, 1918 – 2013

"As a university long dedicated to human rights around the globe and civil rights here at home, we in the Columbia community feel acutely the loss of a true world leader like Nelson Mandela," said Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger.

Nobel laureate Leymah Gbowee at the Feb. 18 World Leaders Forum Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

When Liberian activists held a sit-in, their whole nation stood up and noticed.

The Jan. 14 launch event featured panel discussions on the impacts of media on democracy and sustainable development in the region.

Columbia and Columbians have long been working across many regions in Africa, from the Mailman School’s leadership of AIDS/HIV programs and the Earth Institute’s research on sustainable development to the many scholars of African history and politics, culture and society.

Gregory Mann
Earlier this summer, Islamic militants in the West African nation of Mali destroyed the tombs of Sufi Muslim saints in the fabled city of Timbuktu.