Arts

Look up! As you walk through some of New York’s best-loved public spaces, you’ll see the magnificent work of Spanish immigrant Rafael Guastavino, who, with his son Rafael Jr., figured out how to decorate the grand domes and arches of America’s leading Beaux-Arts architects.

Harold Rosenbaum, distinguished scholar, teacher and choral conductor, is the recipient of the 2014 Ditson Conductor’s Award for the advancement of American music, Columbia University has announced.

Gilbert and Sullivan. George and Ira Gershwin. Rodgers and Hammerstein. Dorothy Fields and anybody. Let’s not forget Mozart and Lorenzo Da Ponte, who wrote the libretto for Don Giovanni and, much later, became Columbia’s first professor of Italian.

After a cross-country journey through the American heartland where many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic houses still stand, the vast archives of the towering American architect have arrived in New York City.

Columnia Arts

Disney's Frozen, written and co-directed by Columbia Film alumna Jennifer Lee ('05), won two Academy Awards—Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song. Frozen has garnered widespread critical acclaim since its release in November 2013.

A century ago, Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) was among the city’s most prominent sculptors, known for her naturalistic animal sculptures and heroic figures.

Image: John Sloan's Sunday, Women Drying Their Hair

Over 27 days in 1913, 87,000 New Yorkers visited the 69th Regiment Armory at Lexington Avenue and 25th Street and came face-to-face with modern art for the first time. “Everybody went and everybody talked about it,” wrote photographer and author Carl Van Vechten.

Zero Mostel as Tevye in "Fiddler on the Roof."

Tradition! Tradition! Alisa Solomon, a professor at the Graduate School of Journalism, has written a book about a musical that was so wildly successful, it became a tradition all its own.

Teachers College has long been regarded as a living laboratory for the theories of the Columbia philosophy professor and educational reformer John Dewey.

Over the course of five days in October, Brooklyn-based artist Rafael Vargas-Suarez transformed the lobby of Miller Theatre at Columbia University into an immersive artwork with a large-scale wall drawing.

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