Chemistry

When Koji Nakanishi retired six years ago, the chemistry department threw a party for him, complete with a cake that said, “Happy Retirement, Koji. See you tomorrow!” Sure enough, he was back in his Chandler Hall office the next day, where he continues to work six days a week.

Anita Burgos stands inside an enclosure with zebra finches in Sarah Woolley's lab during the summer of 2009. She is studying the effects of developmental experience on song preference.

Suppose you’re in an elevator standing next to someone with a million dollars in grant money to fund your research, if only you can convince her in the brief span of an elevator ride. You’re in need of the proverbial elevator pitch.

Solomon led efforts to identify the cause of the ozone hole over Antarctica.

An American atmospheric chemist who led efforts to identify the cause of the Antarctic ozone hole and a French geochemist who extracted the longest-yet climate record from polar ice cores have won the prestigious 2012 Vetlesen Prize.

Nicholas (Nick) Turro, chair of Chemistry and co-chair of Chemical Engineering departments, passed away Nov. 24. He was 74.

Researchers in the group of Centennial Professor of Chemistry, Samuel Danishefsky, have synthesized what is arguably the largest and most complex biological molecule ever assembled by the methods of organic chemistry.

Left: Dr. Robert J. Lefkowitz, winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Right: Alvin E. Roth, winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics. Images courtesy of Duke University Photography and Harvard University

Dr. Robert J. Lefkowitz, a graduate of Columbia College and Columbia’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, has won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. And Alvin E. Roth, a Columbia Engineering alumni, won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics.

Robert J. Lefkowitz Image credit: Duke University Photography

Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D, Ph.D., an alumnus of Columbia College and Columbia’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, has been awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Chemistry professor Virginia Cornish

Modern science is immensely complex, but Professor Virginia Cornish had a simple idea for solving a big problem.

Ruben Gonzalez views ribosomes—the minute particles in cells that make proteins—as the “machines” of life.

Scott Snyder has always loved red wine, and recently his interest has extended well beyond the dinner table.

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