Climate

Oyster ecosystem

Associate Professor Kate Orff’s Oyster-tecture is a plan to bring oysters, which filter water and form reefs that can buffer against storm surges, back to New York Harbor. The project, expected to be completed by 2019, will create bays to host finfish, shellfish and lobsters while reducing erosion. It will also serve as an environmental education site. Courtesy of Kate Orff

As cities worldwide attempt to redefine the relationship between urban ecology and design in response to a changing climate, landscape architect Kate Orff is approaching her work as a synthesis of art, science, nature, climate and community.
Chile President Michelle Bachelet on Columbia University's Research Boat

President of Chile Michelle Bachelet, at podium, visits Columbia University's research vessel the Langseth with Karen Poniachik (left), Director of the Santiago Global Center. Photo by Carlos Díaz / Columbia Global Center Santiago

Chilean president Michelle Bachelet visited the R/V Marcus G. Langseth on Jan. 9 when it docked at the port city of Valparaiso, touring the ship—which is operated by Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory--on its months-long voyage to map the occurrences of earthquakes and tsunamis in the region.
Geoffrey Heal

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Geoffrey Heal studied physics and economics as an undergraduate, but has always cared deeply about the environment. “I’ve been interested in nature all my life,” he says.

Scientists have found evidence in a chunk of bedrock drilled from nearly two miles below the summit of the Greenland ice sheet that the sheet nearly disappeared for an extended time in the last million years or so.

Corals living in the Georges Bank canyons

Along the walls of Oceanographer Canyon, fish dart in and out of colorful anemone gardens and sea creatures send up plumes of sand and mud as they burrow.

Columbia Science Dean Peter de Menocal

Columbia oceanographer and paleoclimatologist Peter B. de Menocal, was appointed Dean of Science in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Kartik Chandran, associate professor of earth and environmental engineering, is an authority on environmentally sustainable wastewater treatment and sanitation.

Chandran has been collaborating with research groups in Brazil focused on facilitating energy efficient wastewater treatment there.

Climate Change Columbia experts

Patrick Kinney and Madeleine Thomson

In 2009, The Lancet, one of the oldest and most prestigious medical journals in the world, declared climate change to be the greatest public health challenge of the 21st century. Seven years later, it still is.

Wade McGillis has done research in the Caribbean off Puerto Rico and in watersheds in Haiti, but he always comes back to his laboratory in Piermont, N.Y., on the banks of the Hudson River.

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