Community

The Wellness Center will house the Community Health Worker Stroke Prevention program, designed to raise awareness about one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States.

Flores Forbes Columbia University Community Affairs

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Flores Forbes is an urban planner who focuses on economic development in Columbia's local community, particularly Harlem.
The Double Discovery Center, a Columbia College program that works to foster college matriculation for low-income and first-generation middle and high school students in New York City, will be renamed The Roger Lehecka Double Discovery Center.

Coconut chips, vegan cookies, and other tasty delights were featured at a campus food fair sponsored by Harlem Park to Park, a network of local business owners in Central Harlem, in connection with the Columbi

The Double Discovery Center (DDC), a Columbia College program that works to foster college matriculation for low-income and first-generation middle and high school students in New York City, has been renamed The Roger Lehecka Double Discovery Center, thanks to a $2 million gift from an ano

Columbia Great Grad 2016 Jean-Franco Diaz

As a high school junior growing up in Washington Heights, Jean-Franco Diaz benefitted from the SAT prep and pre-college counseling available through Columbia’s Double Discovery Center.

Marcos Rocha Jr. Columbia University Grad 2016
Marcos Rocha, Jr., grew up in Spanish Harlem, but went halfway around the world with the Marines before he got to the University. It was during those tours of duty that Rocha saw the serious psychological issues faced by returning veterans.

Miller inaugurates a new holiday tradition, a playful production that brings to life Saint-Saëns’ musical “salute to feathers, fur, and fins”—Carnival of the Animals.

Double Discovery 50th Anniversary Columbia University
Five decades ago, a pair of Columbia undergraduates recognized striking inequality in access to higher education, so Roger Lehecka and Steven J. Weinberg sought to overcome this divide by exposing local high school students to the rigor of Columbia.

The Community Scholars Program offers independent, community-based scholars from Northern Manhattan access to a suite of Columbia University services and resources that allows them to complete a particular project or attain skills in a particular area.

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