Engineering

Engineering professor Shih-Fu Chang is developing technology to make visual search as effortless as typing keywords into a search engine. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

Engineering professor Shih-Fu Chang is trying to make visual search technology as effortless as typing a keyword like “Morningside restaurants” into Google.

Diagram representing the annual block-by-block building energy consumption in New York City, expressed in kilowatt hours per square meter. Developed by Columbia’s Professor Vijay Modi and Bianca Howard, a Ph.D. candidate in mechanical engineering.

A scanning tunneling microscope in Abhay Pasupathy’s lab used to measure the chemical properties of graphene. The tall cylindrical component on the right is a cryogenic chamber used to keep the ultra-strong carbon material at a temperature of minus-450 degrees Fahrenheit. Top left inset: A color-coded image of electrons around a nitrogen atom (red) embedded in the honeycomb-like surface of graphene (blue).

In a soundproof room in Pupin Hall, a futuristic-looking metallic apparatus is creating three-dimensional images of a material that may one day power a new generation of smaller and faster electronic devices.

3-D confocal fluorescence imaging showing the links between the neurons over multiple regions in the brain in the BBB-opened region.

A new study co-authored by Columbia Engineering professor Kartik Chandran and recently published in the journal, Environmental Science & Technology, shows that reducing nitrogen pollution generated by wastewater treatment plants can come with "sizable" economic benefits, as well as the expected benefits for the environment.

Cell Polarity and Chirality: Human endothelial cells on a micropatterned ring (inner diameter: 250 mm, width: 200 mm) stained for actin (red), tubulin (green), and nuclei (blue). Cells form a ‘rightward’ chiral alignment, while polarized by positioning their centrosomes (bright green) rather than cell nuclei closer to each boundary.

A team of researchers led by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic has developed a new technique to evaluate human stem cells using cell micropatte
Two Columbia News videos will air this month on NYC TV, the official television network of New York City.
 
If we think of the atmosphere as a sponge, we can imagine that the sponge is very dry in the western US, and almost full over humid regions in the eastern US. The addition of moisture to the atmosphere from the land surface in these humid regions makes the sponge leak (makes rain fall). In the west, the dry sponge soaks up any moisture the land surface can contribute without initiating rainfall: rainfall in the west is only initiated by other mechanisms. Credit: Kirsten Findell, NOAA/GFDL
A team of researchers from Columbia Engineering, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, and Rutgers University has now demonstrated that evaporation from the land surface is able to modify summertime rainfall east of the Mississippi and in the monsoonal region in the southern U.S.

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