Engineering

Spoken language expert Julia Hirschberg has received a nearly $1.5 million grant to study deception in speech across cultures.

Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

Better be careful about telling a lie to 

Engineering professor Shih-Fu Chang is developing technology to make visual search as effortless as typing keywords into a search engine. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

Engineering professor Shih-Fu Chang is trying to make visual search technology as effortless as typing a keyword like “Morningside restaurants” into Google.

Diagram representing the annual block-by-block building energy consumption in New York City, expressed in kilowatt hours per square meter. Developed by Columbia’s Professor Vijay Modi and Bianca Howard, a Ph.D. candidate in mechanical engineering.

Steven Bellovin. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

Steven Bellovin always had a knack for catching computer hackers—even before most people knew what they were.

A scanning tunneling microscope in Abhay Pasupathy’s lab used to measure the chemical properties of graphene. The tall cylindrical component on the right is a cryogenic chamber used to keep the ultra-strong carbon material at a temperature of minus-450 degrees Fahrenheit. Top left inset: A color-coded image of electrons around a nitrogen atom (red) embedded in the honeycomb-like surface of graphene (blue).

In a soundproof room in Pupin Hall, a futuristic-looking metallic apparatus is creating three-dimensional images of a material that may one day power a new generation of smaller and faster electronic devices.

3-D confocal fluorescence imaging showing the links between the neurons over multiple regions in the brain in the BBB-opened region.

A new study co-authored by Columbia Engineering professor Kartik Chandran and recently published in the journal, Environmental Science & Technology, shows that reducing nitrogen pollution generated by wastewater treatment plants can come with "sizable" economic benefits, as well as the expected benefits for the environment.

Cell Polarity and Chirality: Human endothelial cells on a micropatterned ring (inner diameter: 250 mm, width: 200 mm) stained for actin (red), tubulin (green), and nuclei (blue). Cells form a ‘rightward’ chiral alignment, while polarized by positioning their centrosomes (bright green) rather than cell nuclei closer to each boundary.

A team of researchers led by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic has developed a new technique to evaluate human stem cells using cell micropatte
Two Columbia News videos will air this month on NYC TV, the official television network of New York City.
 

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