On Exhibit

“Tofakhon in Bukhara” by Joan Roth.

Beginning in the 1920s, Jewish men and women, as members of the Soviet avant-garde of state photographers and photojournalists, transformed how people in the Soviet Union visualized, conceptualized and thought about their country, the war and the world around them, according to Professor R

Arts at Columbia

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University presents "HYPER-RESEMBLANCES," curated by Alison Coplan, Heidi Hirschl and Kathleen Langjahr.

Look up! As you walk through some of New York’s best-loved public spaces, you’ll see the magnificent work of Spanish immigrant Rafael Guastavino, who, with his son Rafael Jr., figured out how to decorate the grand domes and arches of America’s leading Beaux-Arts architects.

A century ago, Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) was among the city’s most prominent sculptors, known for her naturalistic animal sculptures and heroic figures.

WHO HE IS: Custodian, Facilities

YEARS AT COLUMBIA: 1

-Nancy Warner

In their book This Place, These People: Life and Shadow on the Great Plains, David Stark, the Arthur Lehman Professor of Sociology and International Affairs, and photographer Nancy Warner pair images of abandoned farms with the plain-spoken recollections of the people who still li

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery has mounted a new show that aims to expand the public’s understanding of the challenging terrain of conceptual art.

Referencing history, art and the subconscious, Paolo Ventura’s photographs function as architectural relics of the imagination, portraying characters and scenarios that are magical, poignant and strangely familiar—he calls them invented worlds.

(Editor's note: The following story and slideshow were published on Sept. 14, 2012. The video was published on Dec. 6, 2012.)

Spider-man clings to the side of a building, cleaning windows; Wonder Woman does a load of laundry; and Superman delivers take-out.

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