History

Columbia campus

Columbia University and Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith are pleased to announce that Dominique Morisseau’s "Detroit ‘67" is the 2014 winner of the Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History.

Image: John Sloan's Sunday, Women Drying Their Hair

Over 27 days in 1913, 87,000 New Yorkers visited the 69th Regiment Armory at Lexington Avenue and 25th Street and came face-to-face with modern art for the first time. “Everybody went and everybody talked about it,” wrote photographer and author Carl Van Vechten.

Pamela Smith speaks at the University Lecture. Photo by Eileen Barroso

History professor Pamela Smith started college thinking she would be a chemist.

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, 1918 – 2013

"As a university long dedicated to human rights around the globe and civil rights here at home, we in the Columbia community feel acutely the loss of a true world leader like Nelson Mandela," said Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger.

Zero Mostel as Tevye in "Fiddler on the Roof."

Tradition! Tradition! Alisa Solomon, a professor at the Graduate School of Journalism, has written a book about a musical that was so wildly successful, it became a tradition all its own.

President John F. Kennedy smiles from stage at press conference, State Department Auditorium, Washington, D.C. Credit Line: Abbie Rowe. White House Photographs. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston

ALAN BRINKLEY, Allan Nevins Professor of American History, Whose John F. Kennedy Volume in the American Presidents Series Was Published Last Year

When Farah Griffin asked her mother what she remembered about World War II, her response was, “All the handsome soldiers who drove the buses in Philadelphia.” Griffin, the William B.

'El Diario La Prensa,' the nation’s oldest continuously publishing Spanish-language newspaper, has given the University some 5,000 photographs documenting the lives of New York’s Latinos and their contributions to the city and its culture.
John Dewey

John Dewey

Few philosophers can boast of having their picture on a U.S. postage stamp. Or on the cover of Time magazine. Or merit a 3,349-word obituary in The New York Times.

Most archives are designed to accumulate material. One collection at Columbia is working to give some of its holdings away.

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