History

A concluding workshop at the “History in Action” conference held at the Maison Française.

The box office success of Steven Spielberg’s "Lincoln" presented a teachable moment for historians seeking to be heard outside the academy.

Learn more about Robert S. Duncanson: An Antebellum African American Artist, on exhibit at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery through December 8, 2012 Visitor Information Hours Robert S. Duncanson: An Antebellum African American Artist.

From left: Tony Kushner, Robert Schenkkan, Jean Kennedy Smith and Dan O’Brien at the Kennedy award ceremony. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

When Jean Kennedy Smith decided to create a drama award to commemorate her late brother Sen. Ted Kennedy and his love of history and the arts, she realized she would need a theater veteran’s help.

Ira Katznelson Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

Ira Katznelson’s first political memory dates to when he was 8 years old. His parents were ardent supporters of Adlai Stevenson, the Democrat running against Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952, and they were stunned to learn that Katznelson’s grandmother did not plan to vote at all.

“Fear,” one informant told Studs Terkel when the latter conducted an oral history of the 1930s, “unsettled the securities, apparently false securities that people had. People haven’t felt unfearful since.” Another reported how “everyone was emotionally affected.

Columbia University announced today that two acclaimed works will be awarded the 2013 Bancroft Prize: a gripping and eloquent history of the human impact on the ocean, and a persuasively argued history of the idea that conflict among nations can be regulated by law.

History Professor Carl Wennerlind’s most recent book focuses on a financial system come undone, a public looking to its government for answers, and a monetary system badly in need of trust and transparency.

(Editor's note: This story was originally published on April 20, 2011. The video was published on Feb. 20, 2013.)

Motion picture magnate Mary Pickford keeping track of her screen persona, "Little Mary" in 1918 (Image credit: Margaret Herrick, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Beverly Hills)

When historian Hilary Hallett was researching the cultural history of early Hollywood, she drew on her expertise in feminism and film production to find a defining event about the fledgling industry—the Fatty Arbuckle scandal, a lurid episode involving the death of a beautiful young woman

Image of President Obama

Then-Senator Barack Obama at the ServiceNation Presidential Candidates Forum, held on Sept. 11, 2008. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

President Barack Obama (CC'83), the first Columbia graduate to be elected president of the United States, was sworn in for a second term.

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