History

The Columbia University community mourns the loss of Jacques Barzun, who died yesterday in San Antonio, Texas, at the age of 104.

Drs. Ron Bayer (left), David Rosner, and Amy Fairchild (second from right) accept the WHO flag.

The World Health Organization (WHO) inaugurated the Mailman School’s Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health as a WHO Collaborating Center for Bioethics, the only such center that explicitly focuses on the ethics of public health.

Senator Ted Kennedy, Copyright 2009 Denis Reggie

Columbia University Libraries and Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith are pleased to announce the establishment of a significant theater award, The Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History, abbreviated as the EMK Prize.

(Editor's note: The Columbia University community joins our fellow New Yorkers and people around the world in remembering those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001.

Gregory Mann
Earlier this summer, Islamic militants in the West African nation of Mali destroyed the tombs of Sufi Muslim saints in the fabled city of Timbuktu.
 

Five members of the Columbia community—including President Emeritus George Rupp—were elected to the American Philosophical Society, the oldest learned society in the United States.

From left: Thelonious Monk, Howard McGhee, Roy Eldridge, and Teddy Hill Photo credit: William Gottlieb

As it grew from a local sound to a worldwide movement, the jazz scene in Harlem was home to legendary music figures whose influence continues to haunt and ignite the local community.

Alice Kessler-Harris interviewed people who knew the playwright and reviewed the papers of literary agents, friends and Hellman’s husband. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

Lillian Hellman—playwright, memoirist, accused liar, communist, muse to mystery writer Dashiell Hammett—never wanted biographies written about her. “She destroyed personal papers,” says historian Alice Kessler-Harris.

Columbia University announced today that three acclaimed works: a highly original history of the American West, a new perspective on the transformation of ideas from the end of the twentieth century, and a startling new perspective on the Civil Rights movement, will be awarded the 2012 Ban

Alexander Gumby in 1950. Gumby's Autobiography in Scrapbooks, Number 5. (Image credit: Columbia University Libraries)

L.S. Alexander Gumby may be one of the most influential historians of early 20th century African American life in New York—even though he never wrote a traditional volume of history.

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