Libraries

The list of the rich and famous who are buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx reads like a veritable Who’s Who of late 19th and early 20th century New York high society: Alva Belmont, formerly Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, F.W.

In the midst of Word War I, Dutch businessman and historical memorabilia collector Maurice Frankenhuis (1893-1969) began to acquire a collection of posters, coins and medals that he then started to sell to support his family while hiding from the Nazis during World War II.

After a cross-country journey through the American heartland where many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic houses still stand, the vast archives of the towering American architect have arrived in New York City.

Sean Manning Udell (CC’11) is less than three years out of college, working as an administrator at a new charter school in Denver. Yet he’s getting emails from academic researchers seeking his help.

Last fall, the last card catalogs that stood since 1934 in room 310 of Butler Library were carted away.

The newest digital workspace on the Morningside campus, called Studio@Butler, isn’t much to look at. Designed to accommodate as many as 40 people, it is filled with movable tables and chairs that can be configured for groups of different sizes.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML) is pleased to announce the acquisition of the collection of Russian composer Serge Prokofiev (1891-1953).

'El Diario La Prensa,' the nation’s oldest continuously publishing Spanish-language newspaper, has given the University some 5,000 photographs documenting the lives of New York’s Latinos and their contributions to the city and its culture.

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