Neuroscience

L-R: Don W. Cleveland, Kevin C. Eggan, Christopher E. Henderson, Daniel L. Doctoroff and Jeffrey Rothstein met at Henderson’s lab at Columbia University Medical Center to mark the launch of Target ALS. Image credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Daniel L. Doctoroff, Bloomberg LP CEO and president; David M.

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified a protein trafficking defect within brain cells that may underlie common non-familial forms of Parkinson’s disease.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg with Peter A. and Debby Weinberg and CUMC Dean Lee Goldman at a celebration for the new Center (credit: Columbia University Medical Center).

Seeking to bridge the transition from pediatric to adult care for people living with cerebral palsy, Debby and Peter A.

Young adult-born neurons (in red) have been engineered to express a protein called chanelrhodopsin, which enables researchers to selectively activate them and study their function in vivo.

People with anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often have impaired pattern separation—the process by which similar experiences are transformed into distinct memories. They often react to events that resemble their original trauma, even when in safe situations.

University Professor Richard Axel (CC'67)

A human nose has the remarkable ability to distinguish among more than 10,000 smells. How it does that was long an enigma until University Professor Richard Axel and his researchers discovered a pool of more than 1,000 different genes that encode olfactory receptors in the nose.

About 10 percent of kids born with kidney defects have large alterations in their genomes known to be linked with neurodevelopmental delay and mental illness, a new study by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers has shown.

Maybe you have heard of robots that can fly. But how about a robot that is able to learn through its own experiences to drive itself to the airport?

Manuela Douglass

WHO SHE IS: Lab Technician, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center

YEARS AT COLUMBIA: 44

Thomas M. Jessell, co-director of the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, believes the program offers the prospect of changing the way that many aspects of academics will be pursued at Columbia in the decades to come.

Images of various preparations used to study traumatic brain injury in Barclay Morrison's laboratory. Left: a mixed culture of brain cells stained for neurons (green) and auxiliary brain cells (red). Center: a hippocampal slice stained for inhibitory neurons (green). Right: a living hippocampal culture on a microelectrode array (black dots) to record neuronal activity after injury.

Barclay Morrison, an associate professor of biomedical engineering, compares the brain's physical response to traumatic brain injury to, of all things, a gelatin dessert.

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