Physics

Photo courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

A new study suggests that a prediction explaining the unusual brightness of some astronomical explosions, first developed by Columbia astronomers and physicists, is correct.
Sebastian Will, assistant professor of physics, and a team of researchers at MIT have taken an important step toward the long-sought goal of a quantum computer, which in theory should be capable of vastly faster computations than conventional computers for certain kinds of problems.
A portrait shot of Andrew Millis
Columbia University Physics Professor Andrew Millis has been named the 2017 recipient of the Hamburg Prize for Theoretical Physics for his groundbreaking research on the electronic properties of correlated materials.

From left to right, the Columbia physicists working on LIGO: Zsuzsa Márka, Szabi Márka, and Imre Bartos.

Three Columbia astrophysicists are celebrating a major scientific discovery – the detection of gravitational waves. The finding, made by the LIGO Observatory in which the Columbia team plays an integral role...

Dear Alma,

This year is the centennial of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Given how famous our physics department became, did he ever come to Columbia to talk about it?

Physics professor Brian Cole is renowned for Accelerated Physics, his two-semester course for first-year students that covers the usual introductory physics sequence, plus relativity, waves and introductory quantum mechanics.

This summer’s announcement that the Large Hadron Supercollider in Geneva had detected likely proof of the Higgs boson, an elusive and long-sought particle, brought back memories for Columbia neuroscientist Larry Abbott.

Mathematics and Physics Professor Brian Greene will launch two free online courses on March 6 as part of his new online teaching initiative, World Science University.

Columbia campus

Three Columbia faculty members have been named research fellows by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, which awards two-year, $50,000 grants to support the work of exceptional early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars.

Five Columbia faculty members have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society.

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