Neuroscience

Rafael Yuste

Photo courtesy of Columbia University

Rafael Yuste, a leader in the development of neurotechnologies that could cure many mental and neurological diseases, is also spearheading a worldwide effort to ensure these powerful tools are used ethically.
Ravi Tomer
Raju Tomer has won a NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, for his pioneering work in developing new technologies for high-resolution mapping of brain structure and function.
National Academy of Sciences logo

Two Columbia professors — a neuroscientist whose work on the visual system could lead to a cure for blindness and a theoretical computer scientist who has helped define the limits of efficient computation — are among the 84 new members elected this week to the National Academy of Sciences. 

Two Columbia professors — a neuroscientist whose work on the visual system could lead to a cure for blindness and a theoretical computer scientist who has helped define the limits of computation — are among the 84 new members elected this week to the National Academy of Sciences.
hydra image with neurons labeled with a green fluorescence indicator

Researchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. In the above image, hydra's neurons are labeled with a green fluorescence indicator. (Yuste Lab, Columbia University)

Researchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. By comparing Hydra’s behaviors to the firing of its neurons, the researchers hope to eventually understand how its nervous system, and that of more complex animals, works.
David Freedberg

Photo by by John Pinderhughes

Since leaving his native South Africa in 1966 to attend Yale and, later, Oxford, David Freedberg’s art historical interests have spanned the globe as much as he has.

Olympic figure skaters make it look easy, but their grace and power comes from years of training that strengthens not only their bodies, but their minds.

In Matteo Farinella's rendering of the brain, a forest of neurons spread their branches to the sky and a bright Milky Way of neurons shine down upon them. (Image courtesy of Farinella)

A neuroscientist and cartoonist, Matteo Farinella is a postdoc in Columbia's Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience program. He will moderate a seminar on Monday, Nov. 20, on the role of metaphor in science and education.

From left to right: Joanna Steinglass and Daphna Shohamy

Psychiatry professor Joanna Steinglass and Psychology professor Daphna Shohamy incorporated cognitive neuroscience in the study of anorexia nervosa. Brain scans reveal the mechanisms that guide restrictive eating.
In a new essay in Nature, Columbia neuroscientist Rafael Yuste joins more than two dozen researchers in calling for ethical guidelines to cover the evolving use of computer hardware and software to enhance or restore human capabilities.
Nikolaus Kriegeskorte at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute organized a three-day conference that starts brings together cognitive scientists, neuroscientists and computer scientists. Kriegeskorte spoke with us about the event and his research.

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