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A Social Work Professor Explores and Elevates the Stories of Young Black Men

Charles Lea finds inspiration for his current research from his and family's experiences in the 1980s and 1990s in California.

The composer, performer, and installation artist’s work gives voice to the voiceless.

Nicole Wallack and her co-editors have put together a book devoted to the time-honored writing form.

Kerstin Perez joined Columbia from MIT this summer, and is using cutting-edge techniques to identify the particle nature of dark matter.

Sophie A. Bryant (CC’23), Astrid Liden (CC’23), and Ilina Logani (CC’22) are among 32 American students headed to Oxford University next year.  

Bogdan George Apetri juggles teaching and making movies, and offers advice to budding auteurs.

In recognition of his role in bringing back Naval ROTC and welcoming former service members to the university, President Bollinger receives a lifetime service award from the School of General Studies at its annual Military Ball. 

A new study shows that an implantable pump can safely and effectively bypass the blood-brain barrier to deliver cancer drugs to the brain.
 

Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America is now revised and expanded, 25 years later.

From science to engineering, writing to social sciences, here are the Columbians who received awards recently.

President Bollinger, Jelani Cobb, Natalia Herbst, and Zeynep Tufekci joined in the global event.

The Athens center will join Columbia’s current network of centers in Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Mumbai, Nairobi, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago, and Tunis. 

Learn the key details about an important initiative supported by employees and retirees that helps Upper Manhattan thrive.

An increase in the number of male nurses is dispelling stereotypes and breaking expectations.

The work "focused on these abstract, yet intertwined ideas of diaspora, common experience, and democracy,” said MFA candidate Aristotle Forrester.

Niccolò Bigagli, a sixth-year PhD candidate in physics, explains how he and filmmaker Ramey Newell created their award-winning short film.

Julia Bryan-Wilson's academic interests grew out of a political commitment to finding alternative articulations for marginalized subjects.

The lawsuit says that the use of malicious software to surveil and intimidate journalists threatens press freedom around the world.

In a presentation at Columbia, his message about the environmental impact of plastic was loud and clear.

From science to engineering, writing to social sciences, here are the Columbians who received awards recently.

Test your knowledge of the past month's news and events at Columbia with questions on dark matter, COP27, and much more.

To commemorate World AIDS Day, a School of Social Work professor reflects on her HIV/AIDS research with vulnerable groups in Central Asia.

Tremendous achievements have been made in the global HIV/AIDS response, yet obstacles remain before the world reaches the point of eliminating AIDS.

Chan has been a reporter and editor at The Washington Post and The New York Times and is currently the editor in chief of The Texas Tribune.

Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Irving Medical Center have identified a new method of inhibiting the unhealthy storage of enlarged fat cells by remodeling fat rather than destroying it.

Nights of Plague was well underway when COVID struck, but the pandemic influenced the book all the same.

In his 20 years at the helm of Columbia University, Bollinger has founded several major initiatives dedicated to harnessing resources from across the entire institution.

This faculty-led group was appointed to assess current symbols and representations at Columbia and establish guidelines for future ones.

A group of writers and filmmakers gathered at Columbia to discuss the best approaches.

Charles Lea finds inspiration for his current research from his and family's experiences in the 1980s and 1990s in California.

The School of the Arts Professor has published back-to-back works of fiction this fall.

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