Immigration

Mae Ngai sitting in front of a bookshelf

At the turn of the last century, as an influx of Europeans entered the United States, many politicians and native-born Americans worried that they would depress wages and take the jobs of citizens.

Elora Mukherjee

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Elora Mukherjee is hoping the midterm elections can change what she says is the worst immigration policy she has seen in more than a decade of representing refugees, asylum seekers and immigrant families in the U.S.

Mae Ngai
Author of the award-winning book 'Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America,' Ngai is an authority on immigration, citizenship, nationalism, and U.S. legal and political history.
Columbia Great Grad 2016 Armando Torres-Garcia
Armando Tonatiuh Torres-Garcia got to the Journalism School after residents in his hometown of St. Helena, Calif., raised money for his tuition. An undocumented immigrant who came to the U.S. as a baby, he hopes to be an on-air reporter. “There are so many things happening worldwide that I want to get my hands on,” he says.
Dan-El Peralta Undocumented Book Cover

Dan-el Padilla Peralta feels an unusual connection to the former prisoners he taught this summer as part of Columbia’s Justice-in-Education initiative.

Photo by Eileen Barroso.

In 1970, Elora Mukherjee’s father arrived in New York City from India on an engineering scholarship with $7 in his pocket.

Mae Ngai

Mae Ngai’s interest in the history of immigration and labor began when she was a high school student in the 1960s.

New Gallery Showcases “Superheroes: Latino Immigrants Who Make New York” Spider-man clings to the side of a building, cleaning windows; Wonder Woman does a load of laundry; and Superman delivers take-out.